New Research Seminar (May 24)

Day three – Friday, 24 May 2019

New Research Seminar

8:00 am Registration for participants, coffee, tea and pastries
8:20 Welcome and presentation of the day’s activities – Kinnicutt Hall

8:30-9:15 Seminar session S-1
A New Approach to Characterizing Asian Lacquer Surfaces Using Surface Metrology
Prof. Patrick Ravines Buffalo State College, & Prof. Dave Sheets, Canisius College

9:15-10:00 Seminar session S-2                                                                                                                                 
Identification of surface features for diffusion bonding applications
Suba Srenevas, University of North Carolina – Charlotte, PhD student, Optical Science and Engineering

10:00-10:30 Exhibits and posters, coffee, tea and pastries

10:30-11:15 Seminar session S-3                                                                                                              
Application of Surface Metrology in Dental Anthropology
Alexandria Peterson, University of Arkansas, PhD Student, Environmental Dynamics Program

11:15-noon Seminar session S-4
Some opportunities of tympanic membrane shape measurement using digital holographic contouring
Pavel Psota, Assistant Professor, Research Centre for Special Optics and Optoelectronic Systems, Technical University of Liberec, CZ

Noon – 1:00pm lunch, exhibits, and posters

1:00-1:45 Seminar session S-5
Exploring the influence of topography on antimicrobial efficacy on copper cold spray surfaces
Matthew Gleason, WPI, Material Science and Engineering, Surface Metrology Lab 

1:45-2:30 Seminar session S-6
New work on multiscale analyses and characterizations
Nathaniel Rutkowski, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, BS ‘21 Aerospace Engineering,
Computer Science Minor

2:30-3:00 Wrap up, discussion for Surf Met Fest 2020 and farewell

 

Abstracts 

A New Approach to Characterizing Asian Lacquer Surfaces Using Surface Metrology
Prof. Patrick Ravines Buffalo State College, & Prof. Dave Sheets, Canisius College
Abstract: Panels were prepared using 14 different formulas of Asian lacquer: laccol, thitsiol and urushiol with the most common additives-oils, pigments and resins. The Asian lacquer panels, prepared in 2017, strictly followed recipes and preparation protocols to minimize differences and ensure standardization of the final products. The five formulas within each of the three lacquer categories differ from the next in the series by one ingredient. These 14 panels should allow us to understand how each ingredient affects the surface texture. Analysis of the surface at each stage of the experiment ranging from freshly made to aged to cleaned lacquer surfaces is key to following changes over time.
Surface metrology using confocal microscopy was used on all 14 Asian lacquer panels. 12 to 13 distinct areas of interest using 10x (area 1,600×1,600 μm) and 50x (320×320 μm) objectives were examined on each lacquer panel. In addition to comparing standard height parameters such as root mean square height (Sq), maximum peak height (Sp), maximum pit depth (Sv), and Sz, the maximum height of the surface, we have also applied principal component analysis (PCA)-data exploratory methods to see variation of data, patterns and determine texture features of the three lacquers.

Identification of surface features for diffusion bonding applications
Suba Srenevas, University of North Carolina – Charlotte, PhD student, Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science
Diffusion bonding is a solid-state welding process that finds its application in niche areas ranging from electronics and sensors to aerospace and nuclear industries and gaining most popularity in laminar object manufacturing. Of the several factors that contribute towards a perfect bonding, surface topography plays a major role. The goal of this work is to be able to relate surface topography to diffusion bonding outcome. To achieve this, cold rolled and ground samples are used for the process and segmentation using “Regions” analysis is performed to investigate the behavior of individual surface features. The bonded area is examined at selected sites (which were measured under white light interferometer before bonding) tocorrelate the surface parameters with the efficiency of diffusion bonding. The experimental percent bonded area is compared with that predicted by the theoretical model.

Application of Surface Metrology in Dental Anthropology
Alexandria Peterson, University of Arkansas, PhD Student, Environmental Dynamics Program
Teeth have long been a subject of study in anthropology and fossil animal studies. In addition to being ubiquitous in fossil assemblages, teeth are the direct point of contact between an organism and its food. They inform us on diet and evolutionary adaptations of many animals as well as on environmental change. Dental microwear examines dental wear textures created from the interaction between food and teeth. Initial studies were plagued by high error rates and expensive technology. Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA), using scale sensitive fractal analysis, applies surface metrology to dental studies to decrease measurement error and measure surfaces in 3D. DMTA has become a standard, applied to a myriad of animal species from the humble mouse to the teeth of dinosaurs. This talk reviews the application of surface metrology to dental microwear studies, highlighting major research endeavors and looking toward future avenues for continued work.

Some opportunities of tympanic membrane shape measurement using digital holographic contouring
Pavel Psota, Assistant Professor, Research Centre for Special Optics and Optoelectronic Systems, Technical University of Liberec, CZ, Surface topography at low spatial frequencies represents shape of a surface. Shape measurement is an integral part of various science and engineering disciplines. Digital holographic contouring (DHC) techniques are full-filed and contactless methods that can be advantageously used to measure surface shape in many applications. Two different techniques of DHC are mentioned in this talks. The first technique uses sweeping of laser wavelength. As the wavelength of the laser light goes continuously through the tuning interval, change rate of measured optical phase as a function of the optical frequency can be used for a retrieval of absolute surface shape. The second technique is based on sweeping of illumination direction of the measured surface. Both techniques are analyzed, compared and demonstrated on shape measurement of tympanic membrane.

New work on multiscale analyses and characterizations
Nathaniel Rutkowski, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, BS ‘21 Aerospace Engineering, Computer Science Minor
This will be a demonstration of recently developed shareware for multiscale statistical testing of area-scale analyses including:
1- Multiscale regression analysis on relative area and processing or performance results, using different curve types. Requires a unique performance or processing parameter for each data set to be used as independent variable of regression graph. Examples: processing parameters, mechanical properties, etc. vs Relative area at a given scale.
2- Multiscale tests for discrimination, including F-test, T-test, and Analysis of Variance. Each test compares the relative areas of 2 sets of selected data at all scales.
o F-Test – Produces plot of F-value by scale, can view statistics of test at each scale
o T-test – Same as F-test but with T-value/score instead of F-value
o Analysis of Variance – Produces MSR value by scale plots with line showing minimum MSR based on the given confidence value.
New work on forthcoming shareware for multiscale curvature analyses of profiles and of surfaces will be discussed.

Biosketches

Alexandria Peterson is a PhD student in the Environmental Dynamics program at the University of Arkansas. She originally started her research career working with fossil hominins. She received her Master’s degree in Anthropology in 2017, studying the diet and paleoecology of the fossil hominin Paranthropus robustus using dental microwear texture analysis. Her current research seeks to apply dental microwear texture analysis to the teeth of Arkansan coyotes to better understand how human encroachment impacts native carnivore populations. In addition to her research, she also engages in community outreach, helping to share biological anthropology and dental microwear research to the Arkansas community.

Subhasree Srenevas, Optical Science and Engineering PhD student from UNC Charlotte, is currently working with Dr. Christopher J. Evans on surface metrology projects related to diffusion bonding and additive manufacturing. Her initial work involved working towards a speckle interferometry technique for characterizing additive manufactured surfaces. She is currently focused on segmentation of additive manufactured surfaces as an alternative to classic approaches used over the years.

Pavel Psota, Assistant Professor at the Technical University of Liberec and head of Optical measurement methods and metrology at the Research Centre for Special Optics and Optoelectronic Systems (TOPTEC), has worked on various interferometric measurement techniques for over 10 years. In 2015 he completed a PhD in Applied Sciences at the Technical University of Liberec with thesis on investigation of vibrations by means of time average digital holography. He has participated on many international projects including prestigious projects for ESA (European Space Agency). His recent research is focused on the development of digital holographic or interferometric methods for temperature fields measurement and holographic tomography for 3D fields, characterization of internal structure of ferroelectrics by means of digital holographic microscopy/tomography and his current effort is mostly concentrated on absolute measurement by interferometry and digital holography using multiple wavelengths and interferometric methods for measurement of aspherical and freeform optical surfaces.