Short Courses (May 22)

Short Courses, Wednesday 22 May

10:00-11:45 Short courses sessions C-1a
C-1a Fundamentals of Measurement and Characterization of Roughness
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI

C-1b Multiscale analyses of topographic anisotropy
Dr. Toby Bergstrom, Mechanical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

1:00-3:00 Short courses sessions
C-2a Optical measurements of surface topography
Dr. Peter de Groot, Zygo Corporation

C-2b Practical Aspects of Surface Roughness Assessment
Prof. Chittaranj Sahay, Director, Center for Manufacturing and Metrology, University of Hartford
Prof. Suhash Ghosh, Associate Director, Center for Manufacturing and Metrology, University of Hartford

3:30-5:30 Short courses sessions
C-3 Multiscale characterizations and analyses, four principles for success in surface metrology
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI


Abstracts – short courses

C-1a
Fundamentals of Measurement and Characterization of Roughness
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI
This course is for people with little or no experience in surface metrology and for people who would like to review the fundamentals from a new perspective. The most common current industrial and research practices are presented, analyzed and discussed. The abilities and shortcomings of the traditional height parameters, material bearing ratio parameters and some of the new feature parameters are compared and critiqued.

C-1b
Multiscale analyses of topographic anisotropy
Dr. Toby Bergstrom, Mechanical Engineering, WPI
All surfaces have directional properties, an alignment of features or roughness on the surface (anisotropy) or a lack of such an alignment (isotropy) or something in between. In early standards, anisotropy was characterized visually and referred to as lay. By 2000 the multiscale nature anisotropy was recognized. In this class examples are discussed from both anthropological and engineering surfaces. Research presented the past fifteen years is reviewed. Design considerations that impacted the surface roughness parameter “exact proportion length-scale anisotropy of relief” (epLsar), first presented in the journal Nature in 2005 (Scott et al. 2005) and now widely used, are discussed.

C-2
Optical measurements of surface topography
Dr. Peter de Groot, Zygo Corporation
Optical measurement plays an important role in non-contact strategies for 3D visualization and quantification of surface topography. The dominant techniques today involve imaging microscopy combined with confocal, focus-variation, quantitative phase imaging, digital holographic or interferometric principles to achieve sensitivity to height variations in the object surface. In this tutorial, we will review the fundamentals of these advanced techniques, including principles, implementation and best practice examples of applications and data interpretation. We will then move on to interference microscopy as an illustrative example of the current state of the art. Hot topics include performance enhancements, new objective designs for wide-field imaging, vibration robustness, accommodation of highly sloped surfaces, correlation to contact methods, metrology for additive manufacturing, and transparent surface films characterization. We will also consider the impact and importance of calibration, surface texture parameters, and standardization. Finally, a gallery of applications illustrates the current state of the art as well as the future potential for optical methods of surface structure analysis.

C-3
Multiscale characterizations and analyses, four principles for success
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI
The theory, practice and development of multiscale characterizations and analyses in several disciplines using surface metrology are presented and critiqued. Four principles of surface metrology for facilitating the discovery of functional correlations with processing and performance, and for facilitating the discrimination of types of surfaces are explained. Examples are reviewed.

 

Biographical Sketches

Dr. Peter de Groot has over 30 years’ experience in optical dimensional metrology for applications ranging from semiconductor wafer processing to precision manufacturing of optics and industrial components. He is the Executive Director of R&D at Zygo Corporation, where he heads the Innovations Group, tasked with the invention and development of new optical metrology instruments. He also an Honorary Professor at the University of Nottingham, and enjoys lecturing and delivering short courses. Peter is an inventor for 135 US patents, an author of 160 papers and book chapters, a member of the Board of Directors for the SPIE, a Fellow of the OSA, and an active member of the Applied Optics Community.

 

Chris Brown earned his PhD at the University of Vermont in 1983 and then spent four years in the Materials Department at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology where he began working on surface metrology and developing multi-scale geometric analyses.  Subsequently he was a senior research engineer working on product and process research and design at Atlas Copco’s European research center. Since the fall of 1989 Chris has been on the faculty at WPI, where he founded the Surface Metrology Lab in the early 90s.  He has published over a hundred and fifty papers on axiomatic design, manufacturing, surface metrology, and sports engineering. He has patents on characterizing surface roughness, friction testing, and sports equipment. He also developed software for surface texture analysis.  He teaches courses on axiomatic design, surface metrology, manufacturing, and skiing technology.  He also consults and teaches courses for industry, on axiomatic design and on surface metrology.