Workshops (May 23)

Workshops, Thursday 23 May

In addition to the group workshops below there are other hands-on activities. These can be scheduled by appointment or “walk in”. They will be in the lounge area. Sign-up appointment sheets will be by the equipment. These include:
Contact angle measurement for wetting: Prof. Robert Daniello, WPI Mechanical Engineering Department (see description below).
Sensofar S neox, measuring microscope (Confocal, Interferometric, Focus variation): Adam M. Platteis, USA Sales Manager
Keyence, Mathew Moschella, Sales Engineer, Surface Analysis Team, Keyence Corporation of America (Wednesday only)

8:30-10:00 Workshops sessions W-1
Experimental Design for establishing strong functional correlations and confident discrimination with topographies – for additive manufacturing, science, design, quality, forensics, conservation, and all kinds of engineering and manufacturing.
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI

10:30-11:45 Workshops sessions W-2
Additive Manufacturing, issues in measuring, filtering and analyzing surfaces and how to address them
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI

1:00-3:00 Workshop sessions W-3
What’s new in Mountains™ 8.0?
François Blateyron, Digital Surf, developer of MountainsMap™

3:30-5:30 Workshop sessions W-4
Advanced analysis of structured surfaces
François Blateyron, Digital Surf, developer of MountainsMap™

 

Abstracts

W-1
Experiments for correlating and discriminating with topographies for, science, forensics, conservation, and product and process design, including additive manufacturing.
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI
Participants will design experiments using multiscale analyses and characterizations to establish functional correlations and discriminations with topographies, i.e., roughness. The experiments are intended to provide evidence for the design of products and processes, distinguishing the origins topographies, and monitoring degradation.

W-2
Additive Manufacturing, issues in measuring, filtering and analyzing surfaces and how to address them
Prof. Christopher Brown, Mechanical Engineering Department, WPI
Surfaces made by additive manufacturing are markedly different that those made by machining and abrasive processes. The product and process design rules are different and must be developed by experience acquired through care experimentation. Appropriate measurement, filtering and topographic characterizations are especially important when trying to establish strong functional correlations and confident discrimination methods experimentally. This workshop covers the recognition of the special measurement errors that are common in additive manufacturing, how to avoid them, when possible, and how to filter them, and the impact of filtering on subsequent analyses and characterizations.

W-3
What’s new in Mountains™ 8.0?
François Blateyron, COO, Digital Surf
Introduction to the new features of Mountains™ 8.0 and practical applications for all types of instruments: roughness analysis of measured data from tactile and optical profilers with MountainsMap™, topographic reconstruction of images from electron microscopes with MountainsSEM™, calibration of atomic force microscopes with MountainsSPIP.

W-4
Advanced analysis of structured surfaces
François Blateyron, COO, Digital Surf
Exploration of specific tools of Mountains™ for the analysis of structured surfaces and freeform surfaces. Special focus will be put on the automatic detection and characterization of periodical or geometrical features that cannot be analyzed by classical parameters and filters.

 

Measurement of contact angle and multiscale correlation techniques to identify the parameters and scales
Robert Daniello, WPI Mechanical Engineering Department

Understanding the physical interactions that occur on a surface as it is wetted, its tendency to wick or repel water, absorb or shed droplets, adhere or release, is important to the broader solution of wettability and drying problems. It has long been known that the microscale structure of a surface is critical to understanding its affinity for or resistance to wetting but measurable, predictive relationships between topography and wetting behavior have been elusive.  These relationships are the subject of the present work.  We will discuss using multiscale correlation techniques to identify the parameters and scales that are important to wetting problems.  In addition, we will look at the measurement of contact angle between water droplets and surfaces and the difficulties associated with such measurements.  The repeatability of these measurements may also be affected by surface topography due to the local path taken by the contact line in the vicinity of the contact angle measurement.  Interested parties may bring specimens to test contact angle, we will provide the cameras and droplets.

 

 

Biographical Sketches 

 

François Blateyron has been working in the field of surface metrology for more than 25 years. He is expert at ISO TC213 for the development of international standards on surface texture and filtration techniques, and is a regular member of conference and journal scientific committees. He is co-director and co-owner of Digital Surf in France, developer of MountainsMap™, the leading software used by the majority of instrument manufacturers around the world. François also contributes to educational resources on surface metrology such as the Surface Metrology Guide (www.surfacemetrology.guide).

 

Chris Brown earned his PhD at the University of Vermont in 1983 and then spent four years in the Materials Department at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology where he began working on surface metrology and developing multi-scale geometric analyses.  Subsequently he was a senior research engineer working on product and process research and design at Atlas Copco’s European research center. Since the fall of 1989 Chris has been on the faculty at WPI, where he founded the Surface Metrology Lab in the early 90s.  He has published over a hundred and fifty papers on axiomatic design, manufacturing, surface metrology, and sports engineering. He has patents on characterizing surface roughness, friction testing, and sports equipment. He also developed software for surface texture analysis.  He teaches courses on axiomatic design, surface metrology, manufacturing, and skiing technology.  He also consults and teaches courses for industry, on axiomatic design and on surface metrology.

 

Robert Daniello received a Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering at University of Massachusetts, Amherst 2013. He  joined WPI in the fall of 2015 to teach thermo-fluid courses in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The objective of his teaching is to guide students in the application of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to solve practical problems in fields such as transportation, energy, and life sciences. His research involves experimental studies of fluid behavior. Much of his work centers around how fluids move and interact with surfaces at small length-scales, including microfluidics and superhydrophobic surfaces.  His work has demonstrated that superhydrophobic slip will provide significant drag reduction under certain conditions and can also affect separation, vortex shedding, and the near-wall behavior of a turbulent flow. Other interests include microfabrication and advanced, traditional and historical manufacturing processes. He previously served as a thermodynamic systems engineer for United Technologies Aerospace Systems and research engineer at Alden Research Laboratory.