FORW-RD Courses

RBE 595: Haptic and Robotic Interaction 
Faculty: Dr. Jing Xiao
Type: Term-long (2 credits) – A term
Course Description: The course is focused on studying how to detect and simulate physical interaction between two entities (for example, between a robot and an object, or between two objects) in a virtual environment, motivated by applications in haptics, where a human operator interacts with virtual objects via a haptic display device. Applications range from virtual training for a wide range of tasks that require physical interaction with objects, such as dental and surgical operations, to teleoperation of robotic manipulation tasks through haptics, and dynamic simulation. Multi-region collisions and contacts involve both rigid and deformable objects will be addressed. Prerequisite: Not determined yet, but background in data structure and programming is needed.  

RBE/CS 526 – Human-Robot Interaction 
Faculty: Dr. Jane Li 
Type: Semester-long (3 credits) – Fall 
Course Description: This course will introduce the fundamental concepts and theories of human-robot interaction, as well as research methodologies. The lecture topics include: (1) framework of human-robot teaming; (2) level of autonomy; (3) human-robot interfaces for direct and supervisory control; (4) methods and metrics for evaluating interface usability; and (5) user study design. It will refer to the recent research papers to exemplify the design of human-robot interfaces and robot autonomy for cognitive and physical assistance, as well as the interfaces and approaches for robot learning from human demonstrations. Students in this course will work on (1) Individual Paper Reading and Team Literature review; (2) Algorithm implementation; and (3) Courses Projects of design and/or evaluation human-robot interfaces

RBE 4XXX/5XX – Human Factors and Human-Robot Interface  
Faculty: Dr. Jane Li 
Type: Term-long, 1/3 unit for undergraduate students, 2 credits for graduate students; To be offered in the C term of Spring 2022 
Course Description: This is an introductory course on human-robot interaction, offered to first year graduate students and senior undergraduate students. It will introduce (1) the behavior and preference of human motor control and motor learning, and (2) how they influence the design of human-robot interface and the dynamics of human-robot interaction. Students will also learn how to conduct human movement studies and social science studies for the design and evaluation of human-robot interfaces. Students in this course will work on interdisciplinary projects, with the experts in robotics, social science, nursing, and education.

WR 593: Robot Futures: Design, Ethics, Communication  
Faculty: Dr. Yunus Telliel 
Type: Semester-long (3 credits) – Spring 
Course Description: Engineers and other technologists are increasingly more aware of the ethical, legal, and social impacts of robotics and artificial intelligence. Some of them actively contribute to the creation and communication of new sets of ethical standards, such as the work done by IEEE’s Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems. What are the ethical principles that underpin these new ethical standards? Should these standards be voluntary or enforced by a regulatory body? Since robots and AI systems are designed to work with or alongside humans, do people have a right to understand what autonomous systems are doing and why? How can robotics and AI designers ensure that these systems are transparent and explainable? These are only a few of the questions raised by our society’s increasing technological capabilities. Highlighting connections between design ethics and technical communication, this seminar will help students incorporate humanistic and social scientific insights into the study of potentially disruptive technologies.

MIS 583: User Experience Applications 
Faculty: Dr. Soussan Djamasbi 
Type: Semester-long (3 credits) – Spring 
Course Description: The UX Applications course provides an introduction to using UX methods to study user experience. The course teaches students how to use the newest research tools, including eye tracking and emotion detection, to study user experiences of technological products and services. Students will learn how businesses can benefit from these techniques. Both theoretical concepts and practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects, class exercises, and assignments. 

MIS 585: User Experience Design  
Faculty: Dr. Soussan Djamasbi 
Type: Semester-long (3 credits) – Fall 
Course Description: Designing positive user experiences is becoming increasingly important in staying competitive in the marketplace. This UX Design course offers students hands-on experiences, through the use of real-world projects, that provide them with a strong portfolio of work that showcases their skills in UX/UI, visual, service, experience, and product design. Throughout this course, students will create innovative experiences that enrich their technical fluency in both web and interactive development. The course provides a foundation in art and design in order to help students articulate their work to stakeholders and translate outcomes as business value. 

MIS 586: UX Methods 
Faculty: Dr. Soussan Djamasbi 
Type: Semester-long (3 credits) – Fall 
Course Description: In today’s digital economy, understanding how people use and experience technology is crucial to designing successful technological products and services. This course covers the methodologies and tools for conducting research in the User Experience (UX) field. The course covers both qualitative and quantitative methods for conducting UX research in academia and industry, including surveys, persona development, customer journey maps, and other industry-standard tools for studying user experience. Both cutting-edge theoretical concepts and proven practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects, class exercises, and assignments. 

ME/RBE 530: Soft Robotics
Faculty: Dr. Cagdas Onal 
Type: Term-long (2 credits) – D term 
Course Description: Soft robotics studies ‘intelligent’ machines and devices that incorporate some form of compliance in their mechanics.  Elasticity is not a byproduct but an integral part of these systems, responsible for inherent safety, adaptation and part of the computation in this class of robots.  The course will cover a number of major topics of soft robotics including but not limited to design and fabrication of soft systems, elastic actuation, embedded intelligence, soft robotic modeling and control, and fluidic power.  Students will learn design and fabrication methodologies of soft robots, review and discuss articles in the field, and complete a literature survey to supplement the course material.